Silver-white Pottery Bowl, Kensui, Pure Hand-made by Kazunori Onaka, Free Shipping
13800JPY 112.00€ 127.00$
Our settlement currency is Japanese Yen. The price in other currencies you see here is just for the reference. You will eventually pay in your own currency at the current exchange rate provided by credit card company or Paypal.
Brand: Kazunori Onaka
Available: 1
ADD TO MY BOOKMARK

Our Recommendation

Click here to know more about Kazunori Onaka

授权英.jpg


Silver-white Pottery Bowl, Kensui, Pure Hand-made by Kazunori Onaka, Free Shipping












大中和典経歴English.jpg 

 

Made by Kazunori Onaka

Made in Japan

Size:About Height 7.2cm * Radius 17cm 

Material:Pottery

Capacity:(Maximum) 700ml

Package:  Kiri Wood Box


 

Shipping Cost 
Free Shipping anywhere

 

Shipping method

We use EMS(Express Mail Service). After we ship the product, it will take 3-10days to arrive at your place.  You can track the parcel.



Purchaser of the product must read the below condition carefully.

Return/exchange and refund

    • We will not accept return/exchange of the product unless the products we sold have any damages or we shipped the wrong item.  If we accept the return/exchange, the products must be complete and without any signs of having been used or damaged.  

    • The product is carefully examined before shipping. However, in case there is any damage in the product, you should check the product within 7 days and report to us after receiving it (the days are calculated fromt the proven date of delivery). Otherwise, we will not be responsible for the damage, so please check the quantity, apparent condition, etc., when the product arrives.

    • The color of the product you will receive might look slightly different from the pictures you see in this web page.  This is because depending on the amount of light when the picture was taken, the color in each picture might look different.  Please understand, we will not accept return or make refund because of the above reasons.

    • We will not be responsible for any of the customs clearance and customs duty/tariff paymen.


Kazunori Onaka


Kazunori Onaka

Kazunori ōnaka

 

With a rough surface and blackened color reminiscent of corroded iron, ōnaka Kazunori’s works recall recently excavated artifacts that have long slumbered underground, decaying all the while. It is precisely this unique aura that makes ōnaka’s “Decaying” series so popular: alongside the pieces’ ashen exteriors, glints of silver and golden light on the works’ surfaces suggest beautiful antique metal.

 

In most cases, when ceramics are glazed, the pieces themselves are submerged in the glaze entirely before being fired, making for a smooth and even coating. ōnaka, however, glazes his pieces using only a brush. This technique produces the rough surface characteristic of his works: if he desires a thick coat of glaze on parts of his pieces, ōnaka simply paints them on, many layers deep, producing a one-of-a-kind texture. After an initial glazing, ōnaka further refines his pieces with grindstones, files, and buffing rags, carving away clay and glaze with precision. This process takes several times longer than the process that normal potters must go through, and so ōnaka’s pieces are as few in number as they are high in quality.

 

ōnaka does not restrict himself to a particular genre, and instead creates tableware, vases, teaware, and other objets d’arte. At first glance, many of his works defy categorization, and perplex the viewer as to how they should be put to use, but ōnaka himself enjoys this ambiguity: “People often ask me what a particular piece is supposed to be used for,” he says, “but I want the person who buys the work to put it to use as he pleases.” For his teaware, however, ōnaka is practically obsessed with ease of use. He continues to work toward the perfect teapot, and is constantly studying and experimenting with different pot sizes, pouring methods, and grip types.

 

Born in 1971 in Mine, Yamaguchi Prefecture, ōnaka holds no hereditary connection to the world of pottery: his father was a typical office worker. Though ōnaka himself held an interest in paintings and photography, as well as aspirations toward future creative work, when he was a child, he ultimately landed in his school’s business department during college, and worked various office jobs for close to ten years after graduation.

 

When ōnaka was 29, however, he ran across a flyer for a ceramics exhibition while at a cafe near his house. The exhibition, held in the pottery town of Hagi, a half-hour’s drive away, featured the works of the ceramics artist Keiji Itō. Thinking that it might be interesting to see, ōnaka dropped by. It was his first encounter with the world of pottery.

 

The exhibition was clearly an elegant affair, and the works themselves appeared to be finely wrought iron. When he realized that they were in fact made of ceramic, ōnaka was shocked. Though he had long enjoyed photography and painting, and was therefore well acquainted with that sort of visual art, ōnaka had never before encountered pottery as an art form. Because he could scarcely afford to purchase one of the pieces on display, ōnaka contented himself with an exhibition catalog. When Itō made an appearance, ōnaka was overcome with excitement, and had the catalog autographed.

 

On the same day, ōnaka visited an exhibit on the works of the ceramics artist Shigemi Katō, which further rocked his conception of what ceramics could be. The freedom with which Katō pursued imaginative concepts in his works (by, for example, incorporating architectural elements and styles in the works on display) moved ōnaka. “Huh,” he reportedly thought, “I never knew people could get away with making things like this!” He was surprised, he reports, to find that there were people who would seek out and buy such imaginative pieces.

 

Because Katō lived and worked fairly close to ōnaka’s home, ōnaka telephoned the artist immediately after the exhibition. He then arranged a visit, having Katō show him more of his work and questioning him on the ins and outs of ceramics.

 

ōnaka’s discovery of Katō and Itō’s pieces ended up changing his life entirely. Because he is, by nature, uneasy when dealing with people, ōnaka had long harbored doubts about his life as an office worker, and soon after his discovery, he set his sights on a new career as a ceramics artisan.

 

“I didn’t feel confident that I would be able to make a career in painting or photography, but I figured that since tableware is something that I deal with – that everyone deals with – on a daily basis, making dishes that would sell should be relatively simple. Of course, I might not have made such a reckless decision if I’d actually known anything about the field,” laughs ōnaka. Though making the decision to work in ceramics was simple, it took him nearly five years of earnest work and study to become independent in the industry.

 

Soon after visiting the first two exhibitions, ōnaka began to attend pottery lessons twice a week. The pace of the lessons was slow, however, and the style of pottery he was learning to create – traditional Yagi ware – was not in line with his interests. After six months, ōnaka quit, and instead bought a pottery wheel of his own, resolving to teach himself.

 

While he had a wheel in hand, however, ōnaka lacked a kiln with which to fire any of his pieces or apply glaze. Undeterred, he spent four years relentlessly refining the basics of his craft, creating and returning to raw clay one piece after another.

 

Four years after obtaining his wheel and slowly storing away sufficient funds, ōnaka was able to buy his first kiln. Enthralled with the delight of finally being able to fire and glaze his pieces, he learned all that guidebooks and the internet had to teach him about glazing techniques.

 

Six months after purchasing the kiln, in October of 2005, ōnaka showed a piece that he had fired to Katō, who had become his mentor after he had embarked on his career. Katō praised the piece, advising ōnaka to open his own workshop, and he did just that.

 

ōnaka’s most popular style, his “Decaying” series, dates to around 2012. The style is informed by ōnaka’s own intense research and observation of both photographs of corroded metal and the look and texture of the material itself.

 

Throughout his career, ōnaka has come to enjoy creating abstract objets d’arte more than utilitarian tableware. “If you’re making dishes, you ultimately have to prioritize their function as dishes, making sure that they won’t cut someone’s hand, that they’re easy to clean, that they’re durable and won’t break, what have you. Plus, you can only create and glaze them in ways that are food-safe. When I buy a piece, I like looking at it more than anything else – I’ll secretly take it out late at night and stare at it, grinning. And so in my own work, I think less of functionality than of visual interest, and try to make things that people will want to set out as decoration. When I think that way, the scope of what I can create broadens.”

 

ōnaka says that he particularly enjoys creating vases and tea canisters, whose function places very few limits on their design. His ultimate goal is to create an artistic piece on a monumental scale, one that will take up all of the space that his large kiln has to offer.


【Shipping method】

We use EMS(Express Mail Service). After we ship the product, it will take 3-10days to arrive at your place. You can track the parcel.

【Purchaser of the product must read the below condition carefully.】
  • We will not accept return/exchange of the product unless the products we sold have any damages or we shipped the wrong item. If we accept the return/exchange, the products must be complete and without any signs of having been used or damaged.
  • The product is carefully examined before shipping. However, in case there is any damage in the product, you should check the product within 7 days and report to us after receiving it (the days are calculated fromt the proven date of delivery). Otherwise, we will not be responsible for the damage, so please check the quantity, apparent condition, etc., when the product arrives.
  • The color of the product you will receive might look slightly different from the pictures you see in this web page. This is because depending on the amount of light when the picture was taken, the color in each picture might look different. Please understand, we will not accept return or make refund because of the above reasons.
  • We will not be responsible for any of the customs clearance and customs duty/tariff payment.
【Paypal】

You can use credit card through Paypal. Please visit Paypal website and you can easily sign up and open Paypal account for free.

【Please click here to understand Paypal?】

In order to purchase our products, you simply need to input our website mail address buyjp4u@gmail.com and Japanese Yen purchase amount in Paypal website.