Tokkuri Pure Hand-made by Nobuhito Nakaoka, Japanese Sake Pithcer, Sake Server, Ceramic Sake Server Our settlement currency is Japanese Yen. The price in other currencies you see here is just for the reference. You will eventually pay in your own currency at the current exchange rate provided by credit card company or Paypal.
Brand: Nobuhito Nakaoka
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Tokkuri Pure Hand-made by Nobuhito Nakaoka, Japanese Sake Pithcer, Sake Server, Ceramic Sake Server

 

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Made by Nobuhito Nakaoka

Made in Japan

Size:About Height 12.2cm * Radius 8.5cm 

Material:Pottery

Capacity(Maximum):About 220ml

Package:  Kiri Wood Box

 

Shipping Cost 
Free Shipping anywhere

 

Shipping method
We use EMS(Express Mail Service). After we ship the product, it will take 3-10days to arrive at your place.  You can track the parcel.

 

Purchaser of the product must read the below condition carefully.

Return/exchange and refund

    • We will not accept return/exchange of the product unless the products we sold have any damages or we shipped the wrong item.  If we accept the return/exchange, the products must be complete and without any signs of having been used or damaged.  

    • The product is carefully examined before shipping. However, in case there is any damage in the product, you should check the product within 7 days and report to us after receiving it (the days are calculated fromt the proven date of delivery). Otherwise, we will not be responsible for the damage, so please check the quantity, apparent condition, etc., when the product arrives.

    • The color of the product you will receive might look slightly different from the pictures you see in this web page.  This is because depending on the amount of light when the picture was taken, the color in each picture might look different.  Please understand, we will not accept return or make refund because of the above reasons.

    • We will not be responsible for any of the customs clearance and customs duty/tariff payment.


Nobuhito Nakaoka


Nobuhito Nakaoka
The workshop of Nakaoka
One of the kilns in the workshop
Making a teapot on the wheel
Making a teapot on the wheel
Forming the shape of a plate
Working with the glaze
Working with the glaze
Dipping the bowl into the glaze
Painting the glaze on the rim of the bowl

Nobuhito Nakaoka

 

Drips of blue and red, born of the natural firing process, cut the perfect contrast against a field of rustic white, befitting the colorful name “Shikisai Haiyu.”

 

On the next piece, a great swath of inky black and patches of navy gleam like a mirror, throwing off every color of the rainbow when struck by the light – the eye-catching “Hikidashi.”

 

To complete the trifecta, the rustic “Tanka”: hints of white and an expanse of greenish brown sit atop a burnt-black base, striking an exquisite balance of color and light.

 

Despite being a relatively young artist working in one of Japan’s oldest schools of pottery, Tamba-yaki, Nobuhito Nakaoka has mastered a broad variety of classic techniques. Yet it is the three styles above – all boldly original even while paying homage to tradition, and developed through slow and painstaking study – that truly represent the artist’s skill.

 

Tamba-yaki, dating from the late 12th century, is one of Japan’s six most ancient and significant pottery traditions, alongside the Tokoname, Bizen, Seto, Shigaraki, and Echizen styles. The form is also designated by the Japanese government as one of the country’s culturally important traditional crafts.

 

Tamba-style pieces are typically fired over a long period of time in pit kilns built into hillsides, gaining their unique patina as ash from burned wood rises and then falls onto the clay’s surface. Nakaoka takes that aesthetic and extends it, combining it with techniques of his own to breathe new life into the traditional art.

 

From shortly after his birth in 1977, Nakaoka says, he could see himself working as some type of craftsman in the future. That picture became instantly clear when Nakaoka was in high school. His school’s arts teacher, a ceramics artist by training, taught a single two-hour class on pottery. As soon as he touched the clay for the first time, Nakaoka says, he felt that he could build his future in the field.

 

From that day on, he began telling anyone who would listen that he would become a ceramics artisan. That news eventually reached Tadashi Nishibata, one of the foremost contemporary Tamba-yaki artists. Even before Nakaoka had finished high school, the craftsman had offered him an apprenticeship – the chance to make a career in ceramics. After graduation, he took the position, buckling down to studying the basics of the field.

 

After four years with Nishibata, the young apprentice took a year off to hone his skills at a workshop in Kyōto. It was there that he gained a truly systematic knowledge of what pottery is: what clay does what and why, and the fundamentals of glaze. Re-comprehending through a scientific lens what he had theretofore learned by experience would later prove a key asset to Nakaoka in his own work as an artisan.

 

After that year had ended, Nakaoka returned to Nishibata for two final years of study. Once the apprenticeship ended, however, doubt began to rear its head: “If I’ve lived only in the world of pottery since graduating high school,” Nakaoka thought, “can I really claim to be a complete person?”

 

As questioning arts students are wont to do, he headed overseas, taking a two-year volunteer stint on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent as part of the Japan International Cooperation Agency’s youth volunteer corps, a semi-governmental organization serving underprivileged regions overseas.

 

Nakaoka’s original task was to teach pottery to the island’s impoverished residents. But it became clear soon after he arrived that there had been some mistake: there was no appropriate clay or equipment, leaving him no way to practice his craft. His mission then became to teach art to handicapped children using clay. The two years Nakaoka spent trying to square his ideals with the reality around him ultimately proved to be a period of profound personal growth.

 

“There was very little useful that I could do,” he says. “I had nothing but time – it was a chance for me to think hard about by own future.”

 

When he returned home, he had his mind made up. After a year of rapid preparation, he set out on his own as a ceramics artist. Cheap dishes and other objects provided him with his living while he applied to exhibition after exhibition. But success and recognition stubbornly eluded him.

 

It ultimately took five years for Nakaoka to come up with a style that was truly his own. Much of that time was spent in the time-consuming process of figuring out how to reliably replicate the beautiful patterns that would appear on his pieces during firing. Once that was complete, recognition was his as his pieces appeared in notable exhibitions. He appeared again and again in a competition at the Tanabe Museum of Art considered a traditional testing ground for teaware makers, taking home prizes several years running.

 

Nakaoka’s next great mission is to work with a traditional Tamba-style pit kiln, he says. We can thus expect more great things to come as the artist puts his utterly unique touch on that ancient technique.


【Shipping method】

We use EMS(Express Mail Service). After we ship the product, it will take 3-10days to arrive at your place. You can track the parcel.

【Purchaser of the product must read the below condition carefully.】
  • We will not accept return/exchange of the product unless the products we sold have any damages or we shipped the wrong item. If we accept the return/exchange, the products must be complete and without any signs of having been used or damaged.
  • The product is carefully examined before shipping. However, in case there is any damage in the product, you should check the product within 7 days and report to us after receiving it (the days are calculated fromt the proven date of delivery). Otherwise, we will not be responsible for the damage, so please check the quantity, apparent condition, etc., when the product arrives.
  • The color of the product you will receive might look slightly different from the pictures you see in this web page. This is because depending on the amount of light when the picture was taken, the color in each picture might look different. Please understand, we will not accept return or make refund because of the above reasons.
  • We will not be responsible for any of the customs clearance and customs duty/tariff payment.
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