Pool Water Flower Vase Hand-made by Shin Setoguchi
47667JPY 400.00€ 448.00$
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Brand: Shin Setoguchi
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Pool Water Flower Vase Hand-made by Shin Setoguchi 




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Made by Shin Setoguchi

 

Made in Japan

 

Size:About Height 17.1cm * Radius 10.2cm 

 

Material:Pottery


Package: Paper Box

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shipping Cost 
Free Shipping anywhere

 

 

 

Shipping method
We use EMS(Express Mail Service). After we ship the product, it will take 3-10days to arrive at your place.  You can track the parcel.

 

 

 

Purchaser of the product must read the below condition carefully.

Return/exchange and refund

    • We will not accept return/exchange of the product unless the products we sold have any damages or we shipped the wrong item.  If we accept the return/exchange, the products must be complete and without any signs of having been used or damaged.  

    • The product is carefully examined before shipping. However, in case there is any damage in the product, you should check the product within 7 days and report to us after receiving it (the days are calculated fromt the proven date of delivery). Otherwise, we will not be responsible for the damage, so please check the quantity, apparent condition, etc., when the product arrives.

    • The color of the product you will receive might look slightly different from the pictures you see in this web page.  This is because depending on the amount of light when the picture was taken, the color in each picture might look different.  Please understand, we will not accept return or make refund because of the above reasons.

    • We will not be responsible for any of the customs clearance and customs duty/tariff payment.



Shin Setoguchi


Shin Setoguchi
Workshop of Shin Setoguchi
Shaping the body of yuzamashi with hand on the wheel
Shaping the body of yuzamashi without hand
The bodies of the yuzamashi and teacup
Mixing the clay
Filetring the clay

Shin Setoguchi

 

A green tint emerges and disappears with the thickness of the glaze. Cracks and fissures cut through the surface to lend pieces a sense of depth, while rust-red browns placed as accents direct the eye and stitch pots and bowls into cohesive works of art. Shin Setoguchi’s so-called “Kawaikusa” series conveys just such an image of faded and worn beauty, inspired by the fissures left behind in drying mud after a rain puddle evaporates away.

 

Setoguchi was born in 1979 in the famed pottery town of Imari, Saga Prefecture, to a family completely unconnected with the art. Despite Imari pottery’s world famous stature and the similar fame of its neighbor Arita, Setoguchi’s father was a normal officeworker. Setoguchi himself, however, showed an interest in the arts from a young age, and remembers wanting to grow up to be some kind of artisan. He stepped into this calling when, shortly after graduating high school, he re-discovered the heritage of pottery in his hometown and began attending a training school to learn pottery in the style of Arita ware.

 

At first, Setoguchi intended to work as an ordinary employee at some ceramics factory or other, showing no interest in becoming an artist. The economy had different plans. Setoguchi had graduated from the school during a downturn, and employment was long in coming. Local workshops had begun laying off workers, and it was only through an acquaintance that Setoguchi met with the famed Karatsu ware artisan Jinenbō Nakagawa, eventually becoming his apprentice.

 

Setoguchi learned ceramics as an art from the ground up, beginning by carrying firewood before learning to knead and mix clay, and finally to make glaze.

“Jizenbō Nakagawa did everything on his own, from mixing his clay to crafting glaze. That was something that truly had an effect on me,” says Setoguchi. It was working under the great artisan that made him turn toward the artistic path.

 

Though his master worked mainly in traditional Karatsu ware, Setoguchi found himself drawn to new and innovative styles of pottery even during his apprenticeship.

“I figured that since everyone else was working in traditional styles, it would be fine for me to do something different. Or, rather, that I wanted to do something, anything different.”

 

After three years under Nakagawa and one year of part-time work to save up funds, Setoguchi opened his own workshop in 2004, in his hometown of Imari. During his first two years in business, he practiced in the Karatsu ware style he had so diligently studied. Despite his distaste for the works, Setoguchi says, he “didn’t have the strength to make anything outside what I’d been taught.”

 

It wasn’t until his third year working on his own that Setoguchi found his inspiration in a dried-up mud puddle, left cracked after all water had disappeared. The thought instantly sprang to mind to re-create the pattern on a piece of pottery, and the long trial-and-error process required to perfect the style began immediately.

 

Three more years passed before Setoguchi could reliably reproduce his signature “Kawaikusa” style. Finding a suitable clay was the first challenge. Setoguchi methodically searched the mountains of Saga and northern Nagasaki Prefectures, visiting every construction site he ran across to examine turned-up earth until he at last hit on the right mixture.

 

From the moment he decided to pursue his fissure-pattern pieces, Setoguchi renounced traditional pottery. For the yet-unestablished artist, this meant giving up a steady income as well. “Developing ‘Kawaikusa’ took up quite a bit of my time, and I was tired of making traditional pieces for the sake of money. It was wrong, I thought, to put a slight twist on someone’s style and sell it as my own.”

 

After three years of research while working odd jobs to barely make ends meet, Setoguchi hit on a replicable method for producing “Kawaikusa” pieces in 2010. He recalls his master, who had passed on before his pupil perfected the style, remarked upon first seeing one of the pieces: “I’ve gone and taught you Karatsu ware, and you’ve gone and moved on to something else. What on earth do you really want to do with your life?”

 

“I couldn’t say anything back to him,” says Setoguchi. “It would have been arrogant. I was only a student.”

 

Clay, in all of its variety, has always been Setoguchi’s great love.

“I truly do humbly receive the clay that the mountains give me. Clay is something organic – a product of life. The minute you turn that into a piece of pottery, it becomes inorganic. And yet, when one puts food on a plate or pours tea into a cup, the clay in that vessel once again becomes part of the process of life. It’s cyclical rebirth – like Buddhist reincarnation. In that sense, if they are not used, pieces of pottery are nothing more than industrial waste.”

 

Though his master chided him – “What on earth do you really want to do? – Setoguchi has unmistakably found his own path, and pursued it to the fullest. Perhaps it is the courage and dignity of the artist himself that imbues his works with the vivid power they project.

 


【Shipping method】

We use EMS(Express Mail Service). After we ship the product, it will take 3-10days to arrive at your place. You can track the parcel.

【Purchaser of the product must read the below condition carefully.】
  • We will not accept return/exchange of the product unless the products we sold have any damages or we shipped the wrong item. If we accept the return/exchange, the products must be complete and without any signs of having been used or damaged.
  • The product is carefully examined before shipping. However, in case there is any damage in the product, you should check the product within 7 days and report to us after receiving it (the days are calculated fromt the proven date of delivery). Otherwise, we will not be responsible for the damage, so please check the quantity, apparent condition, etc., when the product arrives.
  • The color of the product you will receive might look slightly different from the pictures you see in this web page. This is because depending on the amount of light when the picture was taken, the color in each picture might look different. Please understand, we will not accept return or make refund because of the above reasons.
  • We will not be responsible for any of the customs clearance and customs duty/tariff payment.
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